Being and Knowing Cannot be Separated

“… our meaning-making and the learning we do is dependent on the material world around us. The material world acts upon our thinking just as much as our thinking acts upon it (Barad 2007).”

Hillevi Lenz-Taguchi Going Beyond the Theory/Practice Divide in Early Childhood Education: Introducing an Intra-active Pedagogy (2010: 49)

Thinking With Things

If learning can be understood in terms of different matter – human and non-human – making themselves intelligible to each other, the inter- and trans-disciplinary classroom and its practices that set out to go beyond the theory/practice binary divide will offer multiple possibilities of understanding and knowing.

Hillevi Lenz-Taguchi, Going Beyond the Theory/Practice Divide in Early Childhood Education: Introducing an Intra-active Pedagogy, 2010, Routledge

Quotidian inquiry

“Quotidian inquiry asks us to consider the inventiveness that accompanies the re-meeting of everyday practices; ordinary actions are the space where possibilities are born.”

The Worlds of the Very Young: Seeing the Everyday in Small Pieces, Mitchelmore & Fleet (2017), in Pedagogical Documentation in Early Years Practice: Seeing through Multiple Perspectives, Fleet, Patterson et al. (2017), Sage Publications.

It is in these ‘small events’ (Deleuze 1994: 163) that we see or uncover big ideas revealing the simultaneous play between concepts and concrete experiences that intersect with ordinary actions and interactions (Oken-Wright and Gravett, 2002)

(Ibid.)

Underneath the large, noisy events lie the small events of silence. (Deleuze, 1994: 163)

(Ibid.)

This again

Early drawing, like later drawing, and the drawing of adult artists, is not primarily a problem-solving situation, nor is it tied to the representation of the observable shape of objects. Drawing and emergent representation as a whole are concerned with the children’s search for their own identities as well as the identities and structures of events and objects.

The Art of Childhood and Adolescence: The Construction of Meaning, John Matthews (1999) p30.